Facebook Pixel

Selected Publications

  • WillInformationTechnology Reshape theNorth-South Asymmetry ofPower in theGlobal Political Economy?

    Bussell, Jennifer and Steven Weber. Will Information Technology Reshape the North-South Asymmetry of Power in the Global Political Economy? in Studies in Comparative International Development, Vol. 40, No. 2, 2005.

    Digital technologies are sufficiently disruptive to current ways of doing things to call into question assumptions about the “inevitability” or “natural state” of many economic processes and organizational principles. In particular, the impact of digital technologies on our conceptions of property rights has potentially dramatic implications for the North-South divide and the distribution of power in the global political economy. Drawing on recent experiences with open-source property rights regimes, we present two scenarios, the “imperialism of property rights” and the “shared global digital infrastructure,” to highlight how debates over property-rights could influence the development of the global digital infrastructure and, in turn, contribute to significantly different outcomes in global economic power.

  • All Globalization Is Local: Countervailing Forces And The Influence On Higher Education Markets

    Globalization trends and innovations in the instructional technologies are widely believed to be creating new markets and forcing a revolution in higher education. Much of the rhetoric of globalists has presented a simplistic analysis of a paradigm shift in higher education markets and the way nations and institutions deliver educational services. This essay provides an analytical framework for understanding global influences on national higher education systems. It then identifies and discusses the countervailing forces to globalization that help to illuminate the complexities of the effects of globalization (including the General Agreement on Trade and Services) and new instructional technologies on the delivery and market for teaching and learning services. Globalization does offer substantial and potentially sweeping changes to national systems of higher education, but there is no uniform influence on nation-states or institutions. All globalization is in fact subject to local (or national and regional) influences.

  • Health Expenditure and Economic Growth: An International Perspective

    . Scheffler, R.M. “Health Expenditure and Economic Growth: An International Perspective.” Occasional Papers on Globalization 1.10. University of South Florida Globalization Research Center (Nov. 2004).

  • Is Housing Unaffordable? Why Isn’t it More Affordable?

    Quigley, John M., and Steven Raphael. “Is Housing Unaffordable? Why Isn't It More Affordable?” Journal of Economic Perspectives 18.1 (2004): 191-214.

  • A New Cycle Of UK Higher Education Reforms: New Labour And New Fees May Foster Mission Differentiation

    A White Paper issued by the Labour government—under Prime Minister Tony Blair—in January 2003 outlines potentially sweeping changes in how British universities might be funded and regulated. These changes would build on three major paradigm shifts and experiments in system building in higher education in the United Kingdom since World War II: the creation and subsequent collapse of a binary system of higher education that included both universities and polytechnics; a decrease in governmental funding and an increase in regulations; and the introduction of student fees into the previously exclusively government-funded higher education sector. The Labour government's new White Paper proposes both to increase funding and to diversify the sources, and more controversially, to allow universities to set their own fees. At the same time, it continues to rely on an accountability and regulatory bureaucracy, and incentive funding, to encourage enrollment growth and to expand access to underserved populations.

  • Spatial Patterns of Non-Agricultural Employment Growth in Rural Mexico During the 90s

    Araujo, Caridad, Alain de Janvry, and Elisabeth Sadoulet. 2004. “Spatial patterns of non-agricultural employment growth in rural Mexico during the 90s” Territorio y Economia 5: 11-28.

    We analyze the expansion of non-agricultural rural employment in manufacture and services in Mexican municipalities during the 1990s and explore the role of geographical features in explaining the local and regional supply of non-agricultural rural employment opportunities. We identify the presence of positive externalities from non-agricultural rural employment expansion in nearby areas. In addition, we find that proximity to urban centers with large services or manufacturing sectors is important in explaining rural employment growth outcomes. Alternatively, for municipalities faraway from urban centers, a larger proportion of the growth in non-agricultural employment (in particular in manufacture) comes from the interaction between a high-value agriculture and availability of roads.

  • Information Technology: The Unsung Hero of Market-Based Environmental Policies

    Blas Luis Pérez Henríquez. “Information Technology: The Unsung Hero of Market-Based Environmental Policies,” Resources. Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future (Fall/Winter 2004).

  • A Framework for Enhancing and Guarding the Relevance and Quality of Science: The Case of the CGIAR

    Kassam, Amir, Hans Gregersen, Elias Fereres, Emil Javier, Richard Harwood, Alain de Janvry, and Michael Cernea. 2004. “A Framework for Enhancing and Guarding the Relevance and Quality of Science: The Case of the CGIAR”. Experimental Agriculture 40: 1-21.The CGIAR Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) is being transformed into a

    Science Council. This paper is about the role of the CGIAR Science Council in enhancing and
    guarding the relevance and quality of science in the CGIAR. In carrying out this role, the Science
    Council must act in a strategic advisory role, basing its advice on: planning and strategy development
    in the context of CGIAR goals; internal self-assessments and independent external monitoring and
    evaluation; and on impact assessments. The paper elaborates these three main functions of the Science
    Council to facilitate the transformation of TAC into a full Science Council.

    The CGIAR Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) is being transformed into a Science Council. This paper is about the role of the CGIAR Science Council in enhancing and guarding the relevance and quality of science in the CGIAR. In carrying out this role, the Science Council must act in a strategic advisory role, basing its advice on: planning and strategy development in the context of CGIAR goals; internal self-assessments and independent external monitoring and evaluation; and on impact assessments. The paper elaborates these three main functions of the Science Council to facilitate the transformation of TAC into a full Science Council.