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Podcast: Talk Policy To Me

Posts from 2018

Episode 2-3: Talking food policy with Nina Ichikawa

 

Nina F. Ichikawa is the policy director of the Berkeley Food Institute. She is a fourth-generation Californian and policy professional dedicated to making good food accessible, sustainable, and culturally appropriate. Prior to joining BFI, she served in the office of Senator Daniel K. Inouye and with the US Department of Agriculture’s “Know Your Farmer, Know Your Food” Initiative. In 2011, she was named a Food and Community Fellow by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy. In 2009 she launched the Food and Agriculture section for Hyphen magazine, and she has also written for Civil Eats, Grist, Al-Jazeera America, NBCNews.com, and Rafu Shimpo. Her writings on Asian American food and farming have been published in Amerasia Journal and Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader. Following research on sustainable food systems in rural Japan and Mexico, Nina received an MA in International Relations/Food Policy from Meiji Gakuin University and a BA in Interdisciplinary Studies/Food Policy from UC Berkeley.

Episode 2-2: Talking policing and criminal justice with Tara Regan Anderson.

 

Tara Regan Anderson (MPP '10) is the Director of Policy for the San Francisco District Attorney's Office. She spoke with Jonathan Stein (MPP/JD '13) about the impact incarceration can have on children and families and why criminal justice reform is not just for advocates.

Episode 2:1 : Talking implicit bias in policing with Professor Jack Glaser.

 

Jack Glaser is Professor and Associate Dean of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy. He is a social psychologist whose primary research interest is in stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. He studies these intergroup biases at multiple levels of analysis. For example, he investigates the unconscious operation of stereotypes and prejudice using computerized reaction time methods, and is investigating the implications of such subtle forms of bias in law enforcement. In particular, he is interested in racial profiling, especially as it relates to the psychology of stereotyping, and the self-fulfilling effects of such stereotype-based discrimination.

Additionally, Professor Glaser has conducted research on a very extreme manifestation of intergroup bias - hate crime - and has carried out analyses of historical data as well as racist rhetoric on the Internet to challenge assumptions about economic predictors of intergroup violence. Another area of interest is in electoral politics and political ideology, specifically the role of emotion (as experienced and expressed) in politics. Professor Glaser is working with the Center for Policing Equity as one of the principal investigators on a National Science Foundation- and Google-funded project to build a National Justice Database of police stops and use of force incidents. He is the author of Suspect Race: Causes & Consequences of Racial Profiling.

Episode 5: Talking mental health policy with Jessie Harney

 

Goldman School student Jessie Harney speaks with host Jonathan Stein (MPP/JD '13) about mental health support for people suffering from PTSD, especially victims of sexual assault.

Jessie is a Master of Public Policy candidate at the Goldman School of Public Policy. She has a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Truman State University and a Master of Science in Biostatistics from Washington University in St. Louis. Jessie’s research interests lie in criminal justice, and more specifically, prison reform. Her hobbies include Muay Thai, anything from the Legend of Zelda series, and cheese. 

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Episode 4: Talking mental health policy with Professor Lonnie Snowden

Psychologist Lonnie R. Snowden is Professor of the Graduate School in the Health Policy and Management Division in the School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley. He also holds affiliated appointments in Berkeley's Psychology Department and in the UC Berkeley-UCSF Joint Medical Program, and he has held appointments in Berkeley's Institute for Personality and Social Research, at the Brown School, Washington University, St. Louis, and at RAND.

Professor Snowden's research focuses on mental health and other health services disparities in access and quality of care, and he approaches understanding these disparities from treatment systems and mental health policy perspectives. He has published more than 170 papers in the peer-reviewed research literature and has received 6 research grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, as well as receiving research awards from many other sources.He contributed to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General and was co-scientific editor of Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity: A Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General.

His outstanding achievement awards include The American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Contributions to Research in Public Policy, The Surgeon General's Exemplary Service Award, the Berkeley Citation, and the American Public Health Association's Steve Banks Mentoring Award.