Goldman School of Public Policy - University of California, Berkeley

Information from the Hague

The Hague Convention on International Child Abduction

The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction is actually part of a series of conventions that were adopted by numerous signatories over the course of the past century to formalize a legal process to deal with private legal matters across international boundaries. Over 80 member states and member party states have joined on to this convention.

The Hague Convention convened in 1980, and the convention entered into effect in 1983. The United States ratified the Convention in 1988. For more information, view the Hague Convention home page including information on member states, case law and frequently asked questions.

The Hague Convention: International Child Abduction and Domestic Violence

Family law practitioners, advocates and judges can find guidance from various resources including the full text of the Hague Convention and publications from the Hague Convention. Relevant information includes judges' newsletters and practice guides, as well as other resources intended to assist family law practitioners in these matters.

The Permanent Bureau of the Hague Conference on Private International Law maintains a database on leading cases called the International Child Abduction Database (INCADAT). Practitioners, advocates, judges and parents can research judicial decisions on international child abduction from countries around the world.

Contact The Hague Domestic Violence Project

If you are unable to find what you are looking for on this site, such as information about general resources or national and international publications on the Hague Convention, please contact us.