Goldman School of Public Policy - University of California, Berkeley

Project Reports

Research Study Supported by the National Institute for Justice

Final Report Now Available

Our 400 page Final Report to the National Institute of Justice is now available for free download. (The file is over 2MB in PDF format). It is also now available from the U.S. National Criminal Justice Reference Service as Document Number 232624. We have created a separate file containing only the Executive Summary that is also a free download.

Recent Articles

An article titled U.S. Judicial Implementation of the Hague Convention in Cases Alleging Domestic Violence was published in the Spring 2011 issue of the Juvenile & Family Court Journal. It reports an analysis of 47 published decisions by U.S. courts on Hague Convention cases involving allegations of domestic violence. In addition, the Hague Conference on Private International Law will publish an article in the Spring 2011 issue of The Judges' Newsletter.

Presentation at the National Institute of Justice is online

On October 12, 2010, Profs. Edleson and Lindhorst and Ms. Shetty presented findings from our research project to an audience of policy makers in Washington, D.C., at a Research in the Real World event sponsored by the National Institute of Justice. You may watch the slides and listen to the presentation online by going to the National Institute of Justice's Research in the Real World website and scrolling down to "Past Seminars".

Time Magazine covers HagueDV study

Time Magazine ran a story on our research on the homepage of its website on Human Rights Day 2010. Read the story "Protecting Kids: Rethinking the Hague Convention" on Time's website. The study was also covered in press releases by the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington.

Our Research Team

Our researchers have been studying the impact of Hague Convention cases upon the individuals involved. The purpose of this study was to improve our understanding of the situation of women who have come into the United States with their children after leaving an abusive relationship in another country and who then become involved in a legal dispute under the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

The study included in-depth 22 interviews with mothers around the world, as well as 15 of their attorneys, eight petitioner fathers' attorneys and five others such as psychologists, guardians ad litem and advocates involved in Hague Convention cases heard in U.S. courts. In addition, we analyzed 47 published judicial decisions in Hague Convention cases in U.S. courts involving allegations of domestic violence.

About This Study

Our study is affiliated with the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington and was funded by the National Institute of Justice. For more information on the study, please contact us.